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Bill Nye Fights Climate “Skeptics” And Creationists

A relatively light week of openings is counterbalanced by the films’ overall thematic heaviness. This week viewers can see everything from Bill Nye crossing swords with creationist Ken Ham to remembering the 1992 Los Angeles riots solely through period footage. Don’t forget to make time for Frances Mc Dormand’s new film, where she’s outstanding as a mother trying to shame her local police force into solving her daughter’s rape and murder.

Bill Nye: Science Guy

In the 1990s, Bill Nye hosted the children’s science popularization show Bill Nye The Science Guy. As a new documentary portrait from David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg shows, Bill Nye still publicly advocates to far different audiences for science. He confronts the creationists and climate change skeptics emblematic of an openly anti-science attitude in America.

Now at the Opera Plaza Cinemas and the Shattuck Cinemas

The Ghost Bride

Mayen desperately seeks a way to save her family from homelessness and to cover care for her father’s heart condition. A Chinese matchmaker’s offer for Mayen to be a wealthy but dead man’s ghost bride seems to offer a way out. But the deal turns spectacularly sour when the groom’s ghost turns out to be jealous and possessive.

Now at the Century 20 Daly City and the Century at Tanforan

LA 92

Dan Lindsay and TJ Martin’s powerful documentary takes viewers back 25 years to the Los Angeles Riots of 1992. The events leading up to riots are recounted via the multiple perspectives provided by archival footage from the period. The key sparks are two controversial verdicts. Viewers will remember the verdict exonerating the cops who beat up Rodney King. But it’s unlikely that they’ll remember the Korean shopkeeper who fatally shot a black teenager yet wound up being fined $500. Both personal stories and big picture coverage grippingly capture the public’s anger at these acts of injustice.

Now at the Roxie Theatre

Mudbound

Dee Rees (Pariah) adapts Hillary Jordan’s epic novel for the screen. Two families live deep in the Mississippi Delta of the 1940s. The white McAllans own the land on which the hard-working black Jacksons serve as tenant farmers. The Second World War has brought social changes to racial relations. But those changes also feel like threats to the Delta’s poor whites. A response mixing both repressive laws and Klan terrorism will change the lives of both the McAllans and the Jacksons.

Now at the Opera Plaza Cinemas

My Friend Dahmer

Marc Meyers adapts Derf Backderf’s darkly comic graphic memoir about the younger days of future serial killer/necrophiliac Jeffrey Dahmer. It’s 1978 and Dahmer is a high school senior. At home, his parents are going through a divorce, with his mother (Anne Heche) in particular having a nervous breakdown. At school, the socially maladroit boy keeps to himself except for the occasional public freak out. A group of alienated boys in the high school band adopt Dahmer as their “mascot.” Privately, Dahmer dissolves dead animals in acid and lusts after a handsome jogger. By the end of this school year, Dahmer will have committed his first murder.

Now at the Roxie Theatre

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

The daughter of Mildred Hayes (Frances Mc Dormand) was raped and murdered. Ebbing’s Sheriff Willoughby (Woody Harrelson) talked big about finding the perpetrator(s) and bringing them to justice. But nine months later, no arrests have been made. A furious Mildred rents three billboards outside Ebbing. The billboards publicly shame the cops for their inaction. What happens next winds up shaking Mildred’s town to its core.

Now at the Alamo Drafthouse, the AMC Dine-In Kabuki 8, and the Century San Francisco Centre 9

About the Author

I’m a film reviewer for the Beyond Chron blog. Agnes Varda and Hirokazu Kore-eda are among my favorite filmmakers. I occasionally break down and watch a good action film…but don’t tell anyone.

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